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    Pink drinks in Birmingham

    Legally Blonde The Musical is coming to the Alexandra Theatre in Birmingham this week, and I decided to compile a list of pink drinks in the city, in homage to Elle Woods.

    For anyone not familiar with the musical, it’s based off the 2001 box-office smash movie starring Reese Witherspoon as Elle Woods, a seemingly ditzy sorority girl who decides the best way to win her ex-boyfriend back is to follow him to law school.  Sure, it’s formulaic and predictable, but that’s sort of why I watch it – and Reese Witherspoon is kinda brilliant in it. It’s also very, very pink.

    And just like Elle Woods, pink drinks get stereotyped based on how they look, because lazy marketeers insist on gendering drinks, somehow suggesting that pink drinks are for girls.  It’s 2018, get a grip, drinks don’t have genders and it’s not like bars require you to whip out your willy if you want to order a drink with blue Curacao in it.

    Some of the best bars in Birmingham have cracking pink drinks on the menu, and with the help of them, I’ve compiled a list. This isn’t every great pink drink in Birmingham and I wouldn’t recommend trying them all in one night (drink responsibly folks) but as the theatre production is in Birmingham for a week – and these drinks aren’t going anywhere soon, you’ve got plenty of time…

    It’s pink…Oh! And it’s scented! I think it gives it a little something extra, don’t you think?

    The Edgbaston is the signature serve of the boutique hotel and bar which shares the drink’s name.  It is elegant and decadent, serves long with floral and fizzy notes coming from the Tanqueray 10, Suze Aromatics, seasonal citrus, all topped off with Rose Champagne. And with the beautiful settings of The Edgbaston on Highfield Rd, it’s hard not to feel like royalty.

    If you want to keep it simple and timeless, but also enjoy something with some fun, the Davenports run pub The Bulls Head on Bishopsgate St, up near Five Ways, serve Old Curiosity Lavender & Echinacea Gin, which turns from purple into a light shade of pink when you add tonic.  As Elle might say “OMG you guys, it’s like magic”.

    Avant-garde mischief makers (at least on twitter), The Wilderness have taken their approach to using British flavours and modernist technique to create a bittersweet, tongue-in-cheek variation on a classic.  Their Nuclear Negroni uses Dry rhubarb gin from Yorkshire and London-made Rosehip bitters to soften and create a fruit-forward drink.

    Champion Cobbler from 40 St Pauls

    Just like the tall tales in the Brooke Windham case, the Champion Cobbler from 40 St Pauls is inspired by a completely made up story of an amateur footballer from Jerez who feel in love with a lass from Yorkshire, and the county itself.  But thankfully this delicious drink of Slingsby Gin, rhubarb & rosehip cordial, Fino sherry, Yorkshire Tea, apple juice and lemon juice is very real, and very delightful. It’s also served in a trophy. How extra.

    With possibly my favourite cocktail name on this list, Gas Street Social’s “Alright, Petal?” cocktail is a fruity, fresh drink which uses Havana Club 3 Year rum, lychee juice, Fraise de Bois and fresh lime, with a delicate rose garnish.

    The Vanguard’s Vintage Candy Punch is inspired by the traditional British drink consumed in punch houses in the 18th century.  Traditionally bowls of spirits mixed with fruit juice, spices, and other flavours, The Vanguard’s uses brandy, rum, citrus flavours, cinnamon and Assam Tea with a Vintage Sweet Cordial to give the drink it’s name. If Elle and her Delta Nu sorority sisters were looking for something spectaular to serve at one of their parties, this would be it.

    The OG gin parlour of Birmingham, The Jekyll & Hyde on Steelhouse Lane has an array of sweet treats both upstairs and down, but it’s their Sweet Gin Music cocktail from the downstairs Mr Hyde’s Hostelry menu with Larios 12 gin, candy floss syrup & grapefruit bitters which will lift your spirits.

    The Ivy Royale

    Elle is taken to an expensive restaurant where she thinks she’s going to be proposed to.  Sadly that’s not the case.  But if Elle were taken to The Ivy on Temple Row, I could totally see her drowning her sorrows in something classy, like their twist on a Kir Royale.  Their The Ivy Royale is made with Briottet rose liqueur, Sipsmith sloe gin & hibiscus, topped off with Champagne.

    Tom’s Kitchen in the Mailbox has a delightfully named Belle en rose, made with strawberry-infused Beefeater Pink Gin, elderflower cordial, Chambord, lime juice, rose wine and topped with soda for a little sparkle.

    Sugar and spice and all things nice isn’t just for girls; The Butterfly effect from Dirty Martini uses Hendrick’s Gin shaken with fresh raspberries, rose syrup, soursop juice, Sichuan pepper, fresh lime juice, and Dr Adam Elmegirab’s Teapot Butters, served with a Silent Pool kaffir lime mist.

    Revolución de Cuba’s Mariposa cocktail

    I like to think Revolución de Cuba’s Mariposa cocktail might be the sort of sugary, tropical drink Elle enjoys whilst she’s lounging around by the pool at her parents house.  With a Koko Kanu coconut rum based and Chambord black raspberry liqueur, passion fruit, pineapple, cranberry and lemon its certainly fruity.

    We know Elle enjoys a good pampering, so she would almost certainly approve of The Alchemist’s Bubblebath cocktail, which uses Tanqueray gin, Aperol, Chambord, lemon, apple and fairy liquid.

    So there you have it, a whole pile of pink drinks you can find in dear old Brum. And whilst this is a post that I did because it was fun, it would be remiss of me not to tell you Legally Blonde The Musical hits the Alexandra Theatre from 21 – 26 May. Tickets are available here.

    I’ll leave the final words up to Elle…

    Whoever said orange is the new pink was seriously disturbed.” – Elle Woods
    Drinks, Restaurant reviews, Reviews

    Beer and burgers with Byron

    Recently I went cycling for the first time since I were a kid and I’m pretty sure the only reason I made it home was because we stopped for burgers before heading back.  Thus reinforcing my idea that burgers are life.  And if burgers are life, then beer is burger’s natural life partner.

    So when Byron were like, come check out our new craft beer menu and tell us how you’d pair the burgers, I was all over this.  Anyone that followed my Melbourne food adventures will know that I have a soft spot for bacon cheeseburgers, and BBQ sauce is my favourite of the sauces (although garlic mayo comes a close second).  So naturally I was going to go for their Smoky burger: mature cheddar, streaky bacon, crispy onions, lettuce, pickles and smoked chilli BBQ sauce.  Now, that’s a lot going on in that burger, so I wanted a beer that wasn’t going to weigh me down, partly because I was going to the cinema after, but also because the rain outside was biblical and if Birmingham was going to end up undersea I wanted to stand a fighting chance of floating.

    I’ve been in to Byron before and even then it was pretty obvious then that they understood the bond of beer and burgers, as they’ve been collaborating with Camden Town Brewery since 2010 to produce their Byron Lager and Byron Pale Ale.  But Byron’s craft beer menu surprised me; the new craft beer menu is, in my mind, unashamedly pitched at beers that will compliment burgers, rather than being an extensive beer menu covering all styles.  And that’s a wise move; I got surprised with a super sour beer and burger accidental pairing in Oz and it just made me sad because it didn’t work at all.

    The beers are typically lagers, pale ales and IPAs and aiming for something middling will keep most people happy, particularly given the range of brewers.  I was pleased to see a couple of Beavertown’s beers on the list, as well as the, now fairly standard, Brewdog offerings and the Bristolian Moor Revival.  Whilst most of these are fairly commonplace names amongst the craft beer lot, there is also Peroni for people who want a name they know.  Birmingham’s branch has five taps, two are reserved for Camden Hells and Byron Pale, and the others are given over to guest beers – Magic Rock’s Hire Wire, which I have a total soft spot for, was on when I was there.  They’re all good burger beers, which is essentially what I want from a burger joint.

    So, to go with the Smoky burger, I went for Beaverton’s Neck Oil.  I really like Neck Oil, it’s a beer I’ll often pick if I see it on the menu because it’s juicy, crisp and not too heavy.  The guys at Beaverton call it a Session IPA, meaning that if you’re ‘On it’ this is a good one to go for because it’s not heavy and filling, and has a relatively low ABV…so you know, you can drink responsibly folks.  I like it for all those reasons, but because it’s light and not too heavy or gassy, it works really well with something filling like a burger, and the juiciness of it makes it really refreshing against the Smoky’s smoked chilli BBQ sauce, which has a really nice kick to it.  The flavours of the beer and burger don’t wrestle, but compliment each other. Individually the Smoky burger and Neck Oil beer are good, together they’re a great pair.  And in the interests of science, my friend Rob (who writes wonderfully, but mainly about SCFC) had the Smoky with the Byron Lager and this worked well too.  That’s the benefit to Byron’s new craft beer menu, it’s a sort of mix and match approach with their burgers which means you shouldn’t get a bad result.

    https://www.byronhamburgers.com/drinks/
    Disclaimer: This post was in collaboration with Byron, but seriously how difficult do you think it was for me to write about beer and burgers? And we all know how serious I am about burgers, all my own overthought views, as per.

    Drinks

    Keeping warm with Highland Park on Winter Solstice

    Last night I went on a magical tour of south Birmingham, past some pretty impressive suburban Christmas lights, getting off the bus to realise that winter has been incredibly late to the party but seems to be on its way.  And just in time for Winter Solstice too.

    With all the stressing about going to the other side of the world in a few days where it’s summer, I’d completely forgotten Winter Solstice was today but the nice people at Highland Park whisky reminded me. I’m not going to bore you with too much but the Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year for us in the Northern hemisphere which means we get the least amount of sunshine.  And of course it’s a big celebration for lots of different cultures throughout history, but the people of the Orkney Island in Scotland get a big kick out of it largely due to their Neolithic archaeology, which they’re well known for.  Particularly notable are the Runic inscriptions, a bit like Viking graffiti, on the inner walls of the Maeshowe – a Neolithic chambered cairn, which does some pretty cool things with the angle of the sunshine around the Winter Solstice. Also, Viking graffiti!

    And with Winter Solstice being a significant time of year in the Nordic calendar and all that Viking history, you know the people of Orkney have a good reason to celebrate.  And they also make Highland Park whisky, which means when it’s bloody cold outside and they’re celebrating, they’ve got something to toast with.  The kind folk at Highland Park sent me a hip-flask of their Highland Park 12 Year Old whisky and a lovely snuggly scarf to keep me warm, so I can join in the fun too.  The Highland Park 12 Year Old is a lovely dram; to me it’s smooth, with honey sweetness, a touch of fruit and a hint of sweet peaty smoke, but not overkill.  I’ve been sipping it as I write this and I don’t think it’s going to last long, although I’m going to try and save some for later.

    Because I’ve been coughing for weeks, Hot Toddys are pretty much my favourite thing at the moment and I need to find a way to mix them up. I get sent a lot of recipes and a lot of them, particularly cocktail ones, make me wonder if anyone has any clue about balance.  But this one I think sounds alright, mainly because the Angostura bitters are going to balance out the sweetness from the honey, which itself compliments the Highland Park.  Rooibos tea you can get in most supermarkets, you can probably switch it out for another type of tea but given it’s said to boost the immune system it makes this drink pretty much medicinal, right?

    Highland Park Hot Toddy

    Firstly, heat your tea cup or mug, then add:

    • 50ml Highland Park 12 Year Old whisky
    • 1tsp honey
    • 130ml Rooibos Tea (tbh I just top up the glass)
    • Add a dash of Angostura bitters or aromatic bitters

    Give it a good stir and garnish with some lemon peel

    …And whilst you’re at the kettle, can you make me one too?

    Disclosure: Complimentary samples, not paid to say anything let alone positive…now can I go back to drinking whisky on a school night, please? It’s research.

    Bar reviews, Drinks, Reviews

    Be at One, Birmingham

    bartender_shaking_BW

    Like most of the rest of the planet, I’m quite looking forward to the end of 2016.  It’s not been one of my favourite years, for various reasons, one of which was the great SD card meltdown and computer strop which meant that a bunch of stuff kinda got forgotten about. 

    But I’m in clear up mode before holiday and I stumbled across some photos from when I went to Be At One bar, a London-based bar group which opened in Birmingham earlier in the year.  I went on the preview night where the staff were overly friendly in a sort of try-hard way which brings out my hatred for small talk even more than normal – talk to me about your release from mental health hospital on the bus stranger, I’m fine with that, but bartenders pretending to care how my day has been…nah.  Look, I get it, bartenders are there to make sure you have a good time but talk overly in depth to me about the maturation process of the spirit you’re pouring, complain about something like the weather or whatever, but don’t channel the spirit of Matthew McConaughey with all your “alright alright” over-enthusiasm.  I’ve been in to Be At One since and they do seem to have calmed down a bit, thankfully.

    cocktail_be_at_one

    Hyperactive bartenders aside, Be At One is underground…I mean literally.  It’s underneath Piccadilly Arcade and the entrance is pretty small because it’s basically a set of stairs, so there’s a nod to the speakeasy but not much more, especially given there’s usually a doorman and red rope outside.  Downstairs the bar has a nice vibe which feels like it encourages a party, without feeling like you got to the party too early if you’re there when it’s quiet.  It’s deceptively inviting in some respects, like you think you’ll kill time having a drink before your train arrives and then find yourself dashing for the platform because you’ve been there too long.

    BW_double_drinks_bartender

    Drinks wise the menu has over 150 cocktails, and some non-alcoholic cocktails and a wine list too.  For those who might think that’s cocktail overload, the menu has some handy tips, namely a top ten’s page which has the most popular drinks on there if you’re not fussy and a flavour wheel which lets you pick your poison based on your preferences for sour, bitter, smooth and then your spirit of choice.  It’s not foolproof, but it’s definitely a good start.

    cocktail_wheel

    I was invited down on opening night and I mainly tried out the classics…which was a bit of a risky move on my part because it seems like several chains in Birmingham think sugar syrup is the answer to everything.  Thankfully this didn’t seem to be the case for Be At One.  Sure, my first Aviation could’ve done with a touch more sourness but was a very good effort.  The Sazerac was made with a spritz of absinthe rather than a rinse, but at least this meant no wastage and didn’t seem to affect the drink, and the Daiquiri I tried was spot on.  One of my favourite drinks, the Clover Club, is referenced in the sweet section of the flavour wheel which worried me a bit.  To me, the Clover Club is a fantastic drink, pre-prohibition era, fruity and dry, where the sweetness comes from the raspberry syrup or grenadine but it’s not really sweet.  Thankfully Be At One’s doesn’t fall susceptible to over-sweetness, although the foam head on the drink wasn’t as bountiful as I’d have liked.

    making_drinks_at_bar

    Overall, my couple of experiences of Be At One have been largely positive.  Birmingham’s cocktail renaissance is in full swing and sure, Be At One is another out-of-towner but unlike some of the others it doesn’t feel like style over substance or that it takes itself too seriously.  But it also doesn’t stray too far and seems to stick to what it knows. The only time I asked a bartender to go off-menu he looked panicked, but with a comprehensive drinks list which is a nice mix of classic and contemporary – and creamy, sweet things if that’s your deal too, there should be something to keep most people content.  Be At One is a pretty safe bet.

    smiling_bartender_be_at_one_BWBe At One, Piccadilly Arcade, Birmingham B2 4BJ. http://www.beatone.co.uk/cocktail-bar/birmingham

    Disclosure: I was invited down to the opening and drinks were complimentary, but this hasn’t affected my opinion. And yes, I really did have a conversation on a bus with someone who’d recently come out of a mental health hospital.

    Drinks, Pop-up and Event reviews, Reviews

    Triple ‘Meet the Brewer’ at Cotteridge Wines to celebrate Rule of Thirds

    siren_craft_cotteridge_wines_web

    Summer feels like a long time ago, but I’m getting through this massive backlog of posts and one of the ones I’d half written up was about the Rule of Thirds event at Cotteridge Wines, way back at the end of August.  Thinking back, it was also about the time I was starting to feel a bit ‘off’ which has made me realise just how long whatever the hell is wrong with me has been knocking about.

    Rule of Thirds is an India Pale Ale born from the flagship IPAs of three breweries, Beavertown, Magic Rock and Siren Craft, blended together to create something unique.  It’s the second time the three breweries had collaborated to create Rule of Thirds and to celebrate they decided to have an event somewhere in the middle of them…Which resulted in a pretty awesome event at Cotteridge Wines with a triple Meet the Brewer event.

    MBBC_magic_rock_stuart_web

    I bumped into the Midlands Beer Blog guys who were chatting with Stuart from Magic Rock.  And, even though it doesn’t feel like all that long since I went to a Magic Rock Meet the Brewer event, I still didn’t really have any questions (unless you count one about beer and food), so I was happy to snap photos and listen to the guys chat about the new brewery site and the brewing of Rule of Thirds, which sounded like a pretty fun day.  Dave, from Midlands Beer Blog has done a better write up, so head over there to have a read.
    kal_cotteridge_wines_pouring_web

    Being lucky enough to be able to regularly visit Cotteridge Wines, I’d already tried the canned version of Rule of Thirds which I thought was delicious, and enjoyed getting the chance to try it again, this time from the tap.  There were plenty of other beers from the three breweries, and I also enjoyed checking out The Great Alphonso from Magic Rock, Peacher Man from Beavertown and Orange Boom from Siren Craft, because it only felt fair to try a beer from each of the breweries.  Although I suspect it might’ve been more apt to try each of the flagship IPAs before finishing with Rule of Thirds, but I’ve never done things properly, so why start now?

    All in all, another fantastic event at Cotteridge Wines- it’s definitely worth keeping an eye on Cotteridge Wines’ twitter to find out what other events they’ve got on.

    rule-of-third_three_beers_web

    Drinks, Pop-up and Event reviews, Reviews

    Gin Festival, Digbeth

    holding-gin-webWe seem to be doing well at rainy Saturdays recently, don’t we?  Last weekend, the heavens opened for most of Saturday, which meant I spent a good chunk of the day wondering how a bit of rain can cause the roads around Solihull to become a giant car park.  Thankfully by the time the evening rolled round the roads and skies seemed to clear.  Which was just as well because I was meeting my friend Andrew (he’s modelling the gin glasses in the top photo) to head off to The Bond in Digbeth for the Gin Festival.

    The Bond is becoming a bit of a go-to place for drinks festivals, having hosted ones for beer and whisky already this year, and the Gin Festival had four bars; two for British gins, one for foreign gins and the final for sloe gins and liqueurs.  I won’t blather on about it too much here, as I did a write up over at the Gin Festival website, which you can read here.  But to end, here’s a photo of some of the botanicals that go into Sir Robin of Locksley gin.

    gin-botanicals-web

    Drinks, Pop-up and Event reviews, Reviews

    Cotteridge Wines 21st Birthday

    beer_burgerOkay, so this actually happened last month, but I popped into Cotteridge Wines at the weekend and ended up joining in with a conversation about their twenty-first birthday, and made me realise I hadn’t posted this yet.  I know, I know.

    Now for some reason Cotteridge Wines does not get the recognition it deserves in Birmingham.  I mean on one hand I think this is a good thing because it means I can pop in and wander round and pick up some excellent beer, but on the other hand every time I hear about how their biggest fanbase is mainly London-located it makes me sad for Brum.  Beer people of Birmingham, you are sorely missing out; Rate Beer have awarded them the UK’s Best Bottle Shop for three consecutive years running.  My journey to get into beer has been massively improved by them; I am always impressed by how well they remember what I’ve bought before, how they’ll save you beers if you tweet them nicely and the recommendations they make when you pop in are fab.  I mean really, they’re great.

    And if that’s not enough to convince you, then the beers on tap for their 21st Birthday should.  You see it’s not just their customers that think they’re awesome, some well respected breweries in the country do too, a testament to the relationship Jaz and Kal have built up with them.  So to celebrate their 21st Birthday, a bunch of breweries offered to make some special beers to mark the occasion and Cotteridge Wines threw open the doors to their tasting room to let their customers in on the fun – and Original Patty Men were around to make sure there was something to eat.

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    I was lucky enough to bagsy a space on the Saturday evening session and above is a quick photo of the tap list for the night.  I’m still relatively new to this whole drinking beer thing but even I knew that was an impressive array.  Sadly I didn’t get to try all of them, but I started the night with Tropical Cannonball, a passionfruit IPA, by Magic Rock Brewing.  A personal favourite of the evening for me was Figgy Bastard by Mad Hatter Brewing Company, as even though this was the middle of summer the almond and fig flavours created the taste of Christmas – all I needed was a mince pie to go with it.  The Mango Lassi by Northern Alchemy was, to me, deceptively non-beery and thusly dangerously drinkable with sweet mango and cardamom flavours coming through.  I also tried Deep Breath by Cloudwater Brew Co, 21st Breakfast by Steel City Brewing and Yam Yam by Beavertown, all of which I enjoyed too.

    As well as some excellent beers, Original Patty Men were there to make sure we could get something to mop up the alcohol.  I bought a bacon cheese burger and it was glorious, as always.  Beers and burgers, what a great pairing right?

    That evening, I managed to bump into Bob (and Sarah) and Dave from the Midlands Beer Blog Collective who have written a really lovely write up of the Cotteridge Wines story to mark their 21st Birthday, so I shan’t regurgitate it here, but it’s worth a read.

    Happy (belated) 21st Birthday Cotteridge Wines, here’s to many more birthdays!

    Disclosure: I managed to bag an invite to the birthday celebrations but bought all my own beers (and burger). Any wildly improper comments about how the beers tasted are all my own, sorry.